Construction Fixings Association

RJ Fixings is proud to be an Associate Member of the Construction Fixings Association (CFA)

As a member of the CFA we provide the highest standard of service in supplying construction fixings and testing the majority of construction fixings and specialist anchor systems to a high standard and with knowledge of how fixings work.

CFA Guidance Notes

Since 1994 the CFA has published a series of Guidance Notes on fixings related issues which are distributed free of charge to anyone who needs them.

These aim to:

  • Improve the selection and installation of fixings
  • Promote the safe use of fixings
  • Raise awareness of developments in fixing design
  • Raise awareness of approvals regimes

Anchorage Systems for Scaffolding: "NASC TG4:04"

June 2004

This Guidance Note has been developed by the Construction Fixings Association for the National Access and Scaffolding Confederation (NASC) . All relevant aspects of the selection, installation and testing of anchors used for tieing scaffolds are outlined. Anchor types discussed in detail are: Drop-in anchors for ringbolts, nylon plugs and screw in eyes, self tapping screws, temporary rubber expansion anchors, resin anchors and throughbolts. Load transfer from the scaffold to the anchor is clarified. Preliminary and proof testing requirements are set out.

Anchorage Systems for Scaffolding: "NASC TG4:04" (11 Pages)

GN Anchors for Steeplejacking

August 2008

Steeplejacking requires anchors for a variety of safety critical applications from laddering to the support and restraint of scaffold frames. This Guidance Note, published jointly by the CFA and ATLAS (Association of Technical Lightning Specialists), has recently been revised (August 2008) with many detailed changes and revisions to the Preliminary and Proof Testing procedures. The GN refers to several Annexes which are not included here. Copies may be requested via the Contact Us page.    

GN Anchors for Steeplejacking

 "Fixings for the retention of masonry façades"

June 2004

This Guidance Note is an extract from "Retention of masonry facades - best practice guide" published by CIRIA. The Construction Fixings Association had a major input to the sections replicated here which give useful and practical guidance on the design of fixings for façade retention systems. All relevant anchor types are discussed including shield, throughbolt, sleeve and deformation type expansion anchors along with resin and cementitious type bonded anchors and undercut anchors. Particular aspects of selection, installation and testing are also covered.

"Fixings for the retention of masonry façades" (8 Pages)

Shield Type Expansion Anchors

February 2005

The shield anchor is the earliest type of anchor and is still popular today by virtue of its many configurations, its easy setting and versatility, being useable in brickwork as well as concrete. This guidance note describes the different configurations - hex bolt type, projecting stud type, basic shield, hook and eye types. Their applications are outlined along with detailed notes on selection and installation.         

Shield Type Expansion Anchors (2 Pages)

GN Anchor Selection

December 1995

A critical stage in the business of utilising fixings the selection process is becoming more and more complex with a wide variety of anchoring solutions to choose from and ever more sophisticated design methods being demanded by the Approvals systems. Although many manufacturers offer comprehensive software to make the whole job much easier an understanding of the influencing factors involved will help no end in arriving at the right solution. This Guidance Note aims to do just that. In some respects it summarises subjects covered in more detail in other guidance notes such as corrosion and installation but other factors are only dealt with here. The emphasis is on the heavier duty anchors for critical applications so the base material suitability and other application parameters of seven of these are summarised in a table.               

GN Anchor Selection

GN Fixings and Corrosion

July 2002

There are several different forms of corrosion but the one thing they gave in common is the high cost of ignoring them. This guidance note describes the different types, and their causes, and gives practical guidance on measures that can be taken to avoid these insidious effects.

GN Fixings and Corrosion

GN Fixings and Fire

August 1998

There are plenty of myths surrounding the behaviour of fixings in fire, many to do with resin anchors. Will they burn? Do they melt? This Guidance Note will put these issues into context and give you practical advice on how to go about specifying fixings, including resin anchors, for safety critical applications when a fire rating is required. Anchors are now gaining European Technical Approvals with details of fire exposure included.     

GN Fixings and Fire

GN Fixings for Plasterboard

May 1995

This Guidance Note sets out to make the selection of fixings for this relatively weak cavity material as simple as possible. The various points to watch out for are described and a two page table gives the application suitability of twelve different types from the earliest solutions of spring and gravity toggles to the modern self drilling and tapping systems.  

GN Fixings for Plasterboard

GN Anchor Installation

March 1996

This is the aspect of anchoring that receives the least attention from contractors and supervising authorities on site. If ever there is an anchor failure - and happily these are few and far between - it is usually incorrect installation that is the root of the problem. There are several ways in which the conscientious contractor can ensure his operators get it right. Reading this Guidance Note can point you in the right direction. Downloading the relevant Sample Method Statement from the Safer Installations page is another; getting training from the manufacturer yet another; ensuring the installation is supervised will help and telling the installer that a sample of installations are going to be proof tested will focus his mind wonderfully. He may then read the instructions! If you need peace of mind getting those proof tests done should provide it - see the Guidance Note on Procedure for Site Testing.           

GN Anchor Installation

GN Fixings for Brickwork and Blockwork

November 1997

Masonry presents some of the most awkward problems for fixings to cope with and there is a bewildering array of solutions to cope with them. This Guidance Note outlines the influencing factors with notes on selection and installation together with a table which details the base material suitability and application parameters for twelve different fixing types from resin anchors to universal plugs.   

GN Fixings for Brickwork and Blockwork

GN Procedure for Site Testing Construction Fixings

December 1994

In the absence of a standard that deals with the requirements for testing anchors on site the CFA has developed its own Guidance which is now recognised as standard practice for this specialised aspect of fixings technology. Guidance covers the two primary objectives of site testing : A) establishing the suitability and allowable loads of a fixing in a particular base material when there is no other data available and B) checking the quality of installation. Aspects covered include the arrangement of test apparatus, sample size, when and how to monitor movement and how to determine allowable loads. (See also FAQs on this subject.)               

GN Procedure for Site Testing Construction Fixings

GN Undercut Anchors

February 1999

Undercut anchors provide a clever solution to one of the awkward problems presented by the nature of concrete. Cracking. We may not want to acknowledge it too often but concrete cracks due to several causes and many anchors are now awarded ETAs which take this into account. The approach that is common to all undercut anchors is the feature which enables them to form an interlock with the concrete and thus develop the full capacity available from the concrete without exerting expansion stresses. This Guidance Note describes the different systems and how to go about selecting and installing them.                

GN Undercut Anchors

GN Resin Bonded Anchors

July 2000

This technique has been with us since 1970 and is now well recognised as the ultimate problem solver. The growth in use for all manner of applications in both concrete and masonry has made this a favourite among specifiers, users and distributors alike. It is also the category of anchors that has now been awarded the most ETAs. This Guidance Note provides a good overview for most of the aspects you need to know about but for more information go to the articles page where there are two feature articles explaining the recent developments in formulations and delivery systems.              

GN Resin Bonded Anchors

GN Heavy Duty Expansion Anchors

March 1997

For serious loads in safety critical applications where both shear and tensile loads are involved there is little to touch the "Thick walled sleeve anchor" as these fixings are sometimes known. High grade bolts cater for the tensile loads while and thick sleeves transmit high shear loads into the concrete. Most have well developed cone geometry to ensure they function in the onerous testing regime of the ETA system at high loads and collapse features are usually built in to enable gaps under the fixture to be pulled down. The usual Guidance Note approach is applied to this stalwart of the fixings industry.             

GN Heavy Duty Expansion Anchors

GN Throughbolt Expansion Anchors

August 2005

The ability to be installed through the fixture, using a drill of the same nominal diameter as the bolt, makes the Throughbolt one of the most commonly used anchor types there is. Value for money accrues from the speed and ease of installation together with low unit costs derived from high volume production methods used in their manufacture. No wonder that more ETAs have been awarded for this configuration than any other expanding anchor type and more ETAs for use in cracked concrete have been awarded for throughbolts than any other anchoring system. This Guidance Note includes practical guidance on the selection and installation of these well proven anchors.            

GN Throughbolt Expansion Anchors

GN Deformation Controlled Expansion Anchors

February 2005

Frequently known by the name "Drop-in" anchors these hammer set socket anchors provide the basis by which most services are suspended from concrete ceilings. Simple in design, reliable and easy to install they have the added advantage that smaller diameters may be installed in the cover above reinforcement. Although around for decades new features have been developed recently with lipped versions to ensure they are set flush with the surface and setting indicators to show they have been correctly set. This Guidance Note covers all you need to know. Well, nearly.          

GN Deformation Controlled Expansion Anchors

European Technical Approvals for anchors used in construction

February 2004

ETAs are becoming the standard means of demonstrating compliance with building regulations. This Guidance Note has been complied by the European manufacturers trade association, the CEO, and gives a comprehensive introduction to the subject and the benefits of using approved anchors for both specifiers and users.

European Technical Approvals for anchors used in construction. (8 Pages)